The earlier you start investing the better. Find out what other tips investors wish they’d known sooner.
How to invest

Top 3 things investors wish they knew

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May 11, 2021
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It happens to the best of us—that moment when we think, “I wish I’d known this sooner!” For a lot of people, it hits when investing. That’s why we’ve gathered a few tips seasoned investors wish they’d known sooner, like:

  • Compounding helps your money grow faster, so investing early is a big plus.
  • Introducing small habits can help you save more and resist the temptation to spend.
  • Investing in a balanced fund can give you instant diversification across stocks and bonds.

Taking even a couple of these steps could make a big difference for your financial wellness. Check out some of our related articles to learn more.

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*Investopedia, 2021

All investing is subject to risk, including possible loss of the money you invest. Diversification does not ensure a profit or protect against a loss.

Investments in target-date funds are subject to the risks of their underlying funds. The year in the fund name refers to the approximate year (the target date) when an investor in the fund would retire and leave the workforce. The fund will gradually shift its emphasis from more aggressive investments to more conservative ones based on its target date. An investment in target-date funds is not guaranteed at any time, including on or after the target date.