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What is an organization account?

Looking to set up an investment account for a business? This type of account offers trading and investment features that can help your business work toward its financial goals.

Consider opening an organization account for a legally established company—including:

  • corporations
  • partnerships
  • limited liability companies
  • sole proprietorships
  • endowments and foundations
  • estates
  • professional associations
  • unincorporated enterprises

Planning for your business or organization?

Take advantage of opportunities to grow that money until you need it.

Things you should know before you get started

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Minimum investment amounts

You'll need $3,000 to buy most Vanguard mutual funds, though there are some with lower or higher minimums.*

And you can invest in any ETF (exchange-traded fund) for the price of 1 share, which will vary throughout the day.

Other companies' funds may have different minimums, so be sure to check their prospectuses. And like ETFs, minimums for individual stocks, certificates of deposit (CDs), and bonds are based on their current market prices.

Taxes

Your investment earnings—the money your money makes—will likely be taxed at the federal, state, and sometimes local levels. The tax rate depends largely on your income and how long you hold the investment.

You could shrink that tax bill by choosing tax-efficient investments.

Expectations for investment returns

Trying to find the fastest road to riches could put your hard-earned savings at risk just as quickly.

Particularly when making a shorter-term investment—less than 7–10 years, for example—you'll want to choose the combination of bonds and stocks that strikes the right balance between risk and reward.

Other investment costs

Some investments have obvious costs—like trading commissions and service fees. But keep a keen eye on expense ratios too. While they don't show up on your statement as a debit, they can take a serious bite out of your savings.

At Vanguard, you'll enjoy no commission to trade ETFs, stocks, and Vanguard mutual funds online. Our account service fees are easily avoidable,** and our expense ratios are 83% less than the industry average.† Put it all together, and you keep more of your money in your account, where it belongs.

Open an organization account in just 4 steps

It's easy to open an organization account online, and it takes just a few minutes.

Step 1

Legally establish your entity or organization.

For organization accounts you'll potentially need to file documents through the State to make things official. Once you have your official documents create a digital copy of them to include with the application.

Step 2

Complete your application online in 4 steps

  1. Log in to your Vanguard account and follow the instructions to open an organization account. Note: If you're a new client, call us at 877-662-7447.
  2. Have these 3 required items on hand:
    • An established organization or entity (an LLC, a corporation, a limited partnership, etc.).
    • A completed organization account application, including the personal information of the authorized signer(s), information about the organization, the type of organization, and the organization's tax identification number.
    • Supporting legal documents (as detailed below).
  3. Attach copies of 2 relevant supporting documents. As part of federal regulatory requirements to prove your organization is established and in good standing, we need copies of pages from the legal documents used to establish the organization. We require:
    • A copy of documented evidence of the existence of the organization. Acceptable documents vary depending on the registration type of the organization. In general, these include articles of incorporation, a state-issued charter, a certificate of good standing (filed with the state), and operational bylaws. See page 4 of the organization account application for detailed document requirements based on your organization type.
    • A document identifying the individuals authorized to transact on the Vanguard Brokerage Account on behalf of the organization. In general, these include a corporate resolution, an operating agreement, and board minutes.

    Note: Once we receive your completed application, it will take 5 business days to review, process, and open your account. Your request will be delayed if you don’t include all the requested documents and information.

    Step 3

    Fund your account

    If the money is coming from your bank, provide your bank account and routing numbers for an electronic transfer or your bank name and wire date for a transfer.

    If it's coming from another investment company …

    Step 4

    Select your investments

    Choose from more than 150 Vanguard mutual funds and 70 Vanguard ETFs®.

    You can also complement your portfolio with funds and ETFs from hundreds of other companies, as well as individual stocks, CDs, and bonds.

    Open your account today

    We're here to help

    REFERENCE CONTENT

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    Expense ratio

    The annual operating expenses of a mutual fund or ETF (exchange-traded fund), expressed as a percentage of the fund's average net assets. It's calculated annually and removed from the fund's earnings before they're distributed to investors, directly reducing investors' returns.

    An expense ratio includes management, administrative, marketing, and distribution fees. It doesn't include trading or sales commissions, loads, or purchase or redemption fees.

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    Other types of taxable accounts

    Uniform Gifts/Transfers to Minors Act (UGMA/UTMA) accounts, which are administered by an adult on behalf of a minor until the child reaches the age of majority (typically 18 years old).

    Guardian accounts, which are administered by a court-appointed guardian or conservator.

    Trust accounts, which hold assets held in a personal or retirement trust. This includes trusts created by a will.

    Estate and other organization accounts, which are owned by an entity versus an individual person. This includes accounts held by corporations, partnerships, professional associations, endowments, foundations, and other organizations.